TADHAMUN تـضـامـن

Tadhamun (solidarity) is an Iraqi women organization, standing by Iraqi women's struggle against sectarian politics in Iraq. Fighting for equal citizenship across ethnicities and religions, for human rights, and gender equality.

جمعية تضامن تدعم المساواة في المواطنة بغض النظر عن الأنتماء الأثني أو الديني وتسعى من أجل العدالة الأجتماعية و حماية حقوق الأنسان في العراق
Petition sign and circulate:

Release Iraqi women hostages, victims of terrorism themselves

بعيدا عن الوطن؛ حراك التضامن مع الوطن فنا، شعرا وكتابةً
Away from Home; Memory, Art and women solidarity: you are invited to an evening of poetry and music 22/3/2017 18:30 at P21 Gallery London click here for more details
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Public meeting at The Bolivar Hall, London Sat.14/5/2016 at 15:00 IDPs : Fragmentation of Cultural and National Identity



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Protest the suffering of Iraqi Christians: No to terrorism No to state terrorism.Hands off our minorities. Hands off our people. Shame on the human rights violators on all sides. Assemble 11:30 on 28/7/14 near Parliament Square, near Westminister tube station London. For more past events click here

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Useful links






Halt All Executions! Abolish The Death Penalty!

We women of Tadhamun condemn the persisting practice of arbitrary arrests by the Iraqi security forces. We condemn their arrests of women in lieu of their men folk. These are 'inherited' practices. We are alarmed by credible media reports of the Green Zone government’s intentions of executing hundreds of Iraqi men and women.


For more info click here
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Professor Zaineb Al Bahrani of Columbia University NY speaking at a our meeting on the destruction/damage to historical sites in Iraq

On youtube: Part1
Part 3
Part4
One more video:



Human Rights Watch: No woman is Safe

Wednesday, July 11, 2007

U.N. Decries Neglect of Iraqi Refugees

Increased Support Urged for Leading Host Countries Syria and Jordan
By Sudarsan RaghavanWashington Post Foreign ServiceSaturday, July 7, 2007; A11
BAGHDAD, July 6 --

U.N. refugee officials on Friday accused donor countries of neglecting the plight of hundreds of thousands of refugees from Iraq flooding into neighboring Syria and Jordan.
"It is unconscionable that generous host countries be left on their own to deal with such a huge crisis," Ron Redmond, a spokesman for the
U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, told reporters in Geneva.
In April, the United States and other Western countries pledged financial help for Iraqis fleeing violence and chaos. But even as the number of refugees in Syria and Jordan swells to more than 2 million, aid has been minimal. So far, donations total $70 million, with an additional $10 million in pledges. But hundreds of millions of dollars are needed to cope with the crisis,
U.N. officials said.
"The two countries caring for the biggest proportion of Iraqi refugees -- Syria and Jordan -- have still received next to nothing in bilateral help from the world community," Redmond said. "The growing refugee population and the communities that host them are facing enormous hardships that will only get worse if the international community doesn't put its money where its mouth is."
Sweden, which has provided safe haven to more Iraqi refugees than the United States and other European countries, announced Friday that it would make it more difficult for Iraqis to seek asylum and would deport by force any denied refuge.
Sweden has provided shelter to more than 18,000 Iraqis since 2006. In contrast, the United States has given refuge to fewer than 800 Iraqis since 2003, according to
State Department figures.
"
Sweden used to be positively unique. Now they've joined the rest of the gang," Bjarte Vandvik, secretary general of the European Council on Refugees and Exiles, told the Associated Press.
About 4 million Iraqis have been displaced inside and outside Iraq. Syria continued to be the biggest host of Iraqi refugees, receiving an estimated 30,000 a month. The United States accepted 63 Iraqi refugees last month, and just 36 in the first five months of this year, according to the State Department.
Syria, which allows Iraqi children to attend free public schools, does not have enough space for all of them. Only 32,000 of the hundreds of thousands of Iraqi children in
Syria are actually in school, Redmond said.
"A whole generation of Iraqi children is in danger of missing out on an education," Redmond said.
Meanwhile in Iraq, the violence continued.
[The
U.S. military on Saturday announced the deaths of six American service members in combat operations in Iraq, most of them in the Baghdad area, the Associated Press reported.
On Friday, two soldiers died when a roadside bomb exploded near their patrol in east Baghdad, and a U.S. soldier and an Iraqi interpreter were killed when an armor-piercing weapon known as an explosively formed projectile detonated near their patrol in southeastern Baghdad, the military said.
In addition, three service members were killed Thursday -- two
Marines in western Anbar province and a soldier in Baghdad, the command said.]
In the southern town of Samawah, clashes erupted late Thursday between police and the
Mahdi Army, the militia of influential Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr. Six people were killed and 11 were wounded, police said.
In the northern town of
Samarra, a roadside bomb killed four policemen and injured three civilians, said Capt. Zuhair al-Badri, a police official.
In the southern town of Hilla, mortar fire struck near a U.S. compound. When
Iraqi police and army units arrived at the scene, a roadside bomb detonated, killing four Iraqi soldiers and injuring two, said Capt. Muthana Ahmed of the Babil provincial police.
In Hawija, about 30 miles southwest of the oil-rich city of Kirkuk, gunmen shot and killed an Iraqi soldier. Another group of gunmen in a civilian car opened fire on a soldier in central
Kirkuk, killing him instantly, police said.
Special correspondents Naseer Nouri and Saad al-Izzi in Baghdad and Saad Sarhan in Najaf and other Washington Post staff in Iraq contributed to this report.


UNHCR:Iraq displacement: Generous host countries left in the lurch

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Articles published on this site do not necessarily reflect the opinion of WSIUI or its members


المقالات المنشورة على هذا الموقع لا تعكس بالضرورة آراء منظمتنا أو أعضاء منظمتنا


Samarra Minrate built in 852 AD

Samarra Minrate built in 852 AD
Building of 1 500 massive police station !
From the angle of the photo, it is possible to calculate that the complex is being built at E 396388 N 3785995 (UTM Zone 38 North) or Lat. 34.209760° Long. 43.875325°, to the west of the Malwiya (Spiral Minaret), and behind the Spiral Cafe.
While the point itself may not have more than Abbasid houses under the ground, it is adjacent to the palace of Sur Isa, the remains of which can be seen in the photo. While the initial construction might or might not touch the palace, accompanying activities will certainly spread over it.Sur Isa can be identified with the palace of al-Burj, built by the
Abbasid Caliph al-Mutawakkil, probably in 852-3 (Northedge, Historical Topography of Samarra, pp 125-127, 240). The palace is said to have cost 33 million dirhams, and was luxurious. Details are given by al-Shabushti, Kitab al-Diyarat.
Samarra was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO at the end of June. The barracks could easily have been built elsewhere, off the archaeological site.--
Alastair Northedge Professeur d'Art et d'Archeologie Islamiques UFR d'Art et d'Archeologie
Universite de Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne) 3, rue Michelet, 75006 Paris
tel. 01 53 73 71 08 telecopie : 01 53 73 71 13 Email :
Alastair.Northedge@univ-paris1.fr ou anorthedge@wanadoo.fr